Omelette with Aged Chaddar, Smoked Salmon, and Asparagus.

Omelette with Aged Cheddar, Smoked Salmon, and Asparagus

Adapted from the Fromagerie des Basques website

Omelettes do not need much instruction, but sometimes it’s nice to have a suggestion for a filling. In this case, add chives to the eggs before they are cooked, and try layering a few slices of Four-Year-Old Cheddar (the Goat Cheddar would also be particularly lovely here) with smoked salmon and blanched asparagus.

 

Advertisements

Four-Year-Old-Cheddar

Four-Year-Old Cheddar

Fromagerie des Basques, Quebec

From along the lower St Lawrence comes this four-year-old cheddar. It never ceases to amaze me how much variety there is in the world of cheddars—the three in this month’s box, made from three different milks according to several different processes, are a small sampling of those available. There are reasons why it is the world’s most popular cheese—relative ease of creation and manifold ways to enjoy it being but two, one on each side of the cheesemaker/cheese-eater divide.

This particular cheddar has a tendency to crumble and a slightly sweet hint to its paste. My assistant described it as being almost Swiss-like; it does have a hint of that nutty-sweet-tang of the Alpine cheeses. Try it with a beer (I think it might go well with an IPA or American Pale Ale) or with the Rioja left over from the previous entry.

Seaside Sheep Cheddar

Seaside Sheep Cheddar

Oldfields Dairy, Oyster Bed, PEI

We’ve had a number of Oldfields Dairy’s offerings over the last year. This month I have a limited-edition sheep’s milk cheddar for you—limited edition because the shepherd is Gabriel Mercier of Isle St Jean Farm, and he is now using his sheep milk for his delectable yoghurt and Alexis Doiron cheese. Oldfields Dairy usually use their own goats’ milk for their cheeses (and soap!), so this is a special cheese indeed.

The Seaside Sheep Cheddar is a mild cheddar (aged under a year), with a clean taste with hints of lanolin. Try it with a local beer—I reckon Upstreet’s Rhuby Social would go nicely—or with a white wine or lighter red, such as a Rioja or a Sauvignon Blanc.

 

Lindsay

Lindsay Bandaged Goat Cheddar

Mariposa Dairy, Lindsay, Ontario

 

The Mariposa Dairy in Lindsay, Ontario, makes a variety of goat and sheep milk cheeses. They make the Plain Goat that I have regularly, as well as Tania Sheep Cheese, which I will have at the stall later this month. All their cheeses are pasteurized and made using vegetarian-friendly rennet. I was in Toronto recently and acquired the Bandaged Goat Cheddar there, so it is a special treat—though I will do my best to find a regular supplier of it, as I am certain it will be a favourite of many.

The Bandaged Goat Cheddar is made in small batches to keep the quality high—that they succeed in doing so is shown in the large number of awards the cheese has won since it was first launched in 2011. (In 2011 it won Champion at the British Empire Cheese Festival, first in Goat Cheddar/tied for second as Best of Show at the American Cheese Society, and Grand Champion at the [Toronto] Royal Agricultural Winter Fair; it’s won First Place at various Canadian and international competitions in every year since except for 2012, which must have been a particularly intense year.)

After the cheese has been pressed into shape, the wheels are wrapped in cheesecloth and placed on a pine board in the aging room. They are turned each week for at least a year to ensure their even aging. This results in a nutty, earthy, and slightly crumbly cheese. (You might compare to Avonlea Clothbound Cheddar or Wookey Hold Cave-Aged Cheddar, which are made similarly.) Lindsay Bandaged Goat Cheddar has lactic acid crystals in the paste—a much sought-after element in a well-aged cheddar.

 

Tiger Blue

Tiger Blue

Poplar Grove Cheese, Penticton, British Colombia

Poplar Grove Cheese, located at the same site as Lock & Worth Winery, was created in 2002 to be a partner to the wines of the Okanagan—for what better pairing could there be than the local wine with the local cheese? They use pasteurized cow milk sourced from a dairy in Sicamous to create their small-batch cheeses. They currently make four types of cheese, of which Tiger Blue is their blue.

Tiger Blue is a veined blue (like Stilton or Shropshire Blue), with a strong bite and a slightly salty taste. Rich and intense are two words the maker uses to describe it.

Try it, obviously, with an Okanagan wine. As a strong blue I would go for a full-bodied red like a Shiraz or a Baco Noir. You could also try a dessert wine or a sweeter rosé; dryer wines will bring out a more metallic flavour. Most blues pair very well with fruit. We don’t get the Okanagan peaches here, but the Ontario ones should be coming soon …

 

Le Vlimeux

Le Vlimeux

Fromagerie le Mouton Blanc, Bas-St-Laurent, Quebec

 

As befits a cheesemaker called ‘the White Sheep’, le Vlimeux is a sheep milk cheese. It’s made from raw (unpasteurized) milk produced on the farm—the makers describe their operation as the “marriage of the Shepherd and the Cheesemaker”—hard to go wrong there! They began as a sheep farm, which in the late 1990s was one of the biggest in Quebec. Increasing costs of shipping the milk to sell led them to develop the cheese-making side of the business, to our great benefit.

 

Le Vlimeux is a semi-firm pressed raw cheese. It is aged for four months, then smoked in the on-site smoker with maple wood. This gives an unusual maple-sweetness element to the flavour, which as the makers say makes it reminiscent of smoked trout. They suggest pairing it with Scotch or artisanal beer, or with Australian Chardonnay, Rioja, or Sancerre wines.

 

July’s Cheeses

Le Vlimeux (Quebec)

Tiger Blue (British Columbia)

Lyndsay (Ontario)

Seaside Sheep Cheddar (PEI)

Four-Year-Old Cheddar (Quebec)

In honour of Canada Day, I’ve put together an array of cheeses from across the country, from sea to sea—if not quite to the third sea, alas (if anyone knows of cheese made up North, please do let me know!). We’re still missing Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and the Territories, but today I’m pleased to add a British Columbian cheese to our repertoire, along with a superb goat cheese I picked up in Toronto, two Quebec cheeses picked up by a friend of mine along the St Lawrence, and one from just up the road in our own back yard.

Le Vlimeux

Fromagerie le Mouton Blanc, Bas-St-Laurent, Quebec

As befits a cheesemaker called ‘the White Sheep’, le Vlimeux is a sheep milk cheese. It’s made from raw (unpasteurized) milk produced on the farm—the makers describe their operation as the “marriage of the Shepherd and the Cheesemaker”—hard to go wrong there! They began as a sheep farm, which in the late 1990s was one of the biggest in Quebec. Increasing costs of shipping the milk to sell led them to develop the cheese-making side of the business, to our great benefit.

Le Vlimeux is a semi-firm pressed raw cheese. It is aged for four months, then smoked in the on-site smoker with maple wood. This gives an unusual maple-sweetness element to the flavour, which as the makers say makes it reminiscent of smoked trout. They suggest pairing it with Scotch or artisanal beer, or with Australian Chardonnay, Rioja, or Sancerre wines.

Tiger Blue

Poplar Grove Cheese, Penticton, British Colombia

Poplar Grove Cheese, located at the same site as Lock & Worth Winery, was created in 2002 to be a partner to the wines of the Okanagan—for what better pairing could there be than the local wine with the local cheese? They use pasteurized cow milk sourced from a dairy in Sicamous to create their small-batch cheeses. They currently make four types of cheese, of which Tiger Blue is their blue.

Tiger Blue is a veined blue (like Stilton or Shropshire Blue), with a strong bite and a slightly salty taste. Rich and intense are two words the maker uses to describe it.

Try it, obviously, with an Okanagan wine. As a strong blue I would go for a full-bodied red like a Shiraz or a Baco Noir. You could also try a dessert wine or a sweeter rosé; dryer wines will bring out a more metallic flavour. Most blues pair very well with fruit. We don’t get the Okanagan peaches here, but the Ontario ones should be coming soon …

Lindsay Bandaged Goat Cheddar

Mariposa Dairy, Lindsay, Ontario

The Mariposa Dairy in Lindsay, Ontario, makes a variety of goat and sheep milk cheeses. They make the Plain Goat that I have regularly, as well as Tania Sheep Cheese, which I will have at the stall later this month. All their cheeses are pasteurized and made using vegetarian-friendly rennet. I was in Toronto recently and acquired the Bandaged Goat Cheddar there, so it is a special treat—though I will do my best to find a regular supplier of it, as I am certain it will be a favourite of many.

The Bandaged Goat Cheddar is made in small batches to keep the quality high—that they succeed in doing so is shown in the large number of awards the cheese has won since it was first launched in 2011. (In 2011 it won Champion at the British Empire Cheese Festival, first in Goat Cheddar/tied for second as Best of Show at the American Cheese Society, and Grand Champion at the [Toronto] Royal Agricultural Winter Fair; it’s won First Place at various Canadian and international competitions in every year since except for 2012, which must have been a particularly intense year.)

After the cheese has been pressed into shape, the wheels are wrapped in cheesecloth and placed on a pine board in the aging room. They are turned each week for at least a year to ensure their even aging. This results in a nutty, earthy, and slightly crumbly cheese. (You might compare to Avonlea Clothbound Cheddar or Wookey Hold Cave-Aged Cheddar, which are made similarly.) Lindsay Bandaged Goat Cheddar has lactic acid crystals in the paste—a much sought-after element in a well-aged cheddar.

Seaside Sheep Cheddar

Oldfields Dairy, Oyster Bed, PEI

We’ve had a number of Oldfields Dairy’s offerings over the last year. This month I have a limited-edition sheep’s milk cheddar for you—limited edition because the shepherd is Gabriel Mercier of Isle St Jean Farm, and he is now using his sheep milk for his delectable yoghurt and Alexis Doiron cheese. Oldfields Dairy usually use their own goats’ milk for their cheeses (and soap!), so this is a special cheese indeed.

The Seaside Sheep Cheddar is a mild cheddar (aged under a year), with a clean taste with hints of lanolin. Try it with a local beer—I reckon Upstreet’s Rhuby Social would go nicely—or with a white wine or lighter red, such as a Rioja or a Sauvignon Blanc.

Four-Year-Old Cheddar

Fromagerie des Basques, Quebec

From along the lower St Lawrence comes this four-year-old cheddar. It never ceases to amaze me how much variety there is in the world of cheddars—the three in this month’s box, made from three different milks according to several different processes, are a small sampling of those available. There are reasons why it is the world’s most popular cheese—relative ease of creation and manifold ways to enjoy it being but two, one on each side of the cheesemaker/cheese-eater divide.

This particular cheddar has a tendency to crumble and a slightly sweet hint to its paste. My assistant described it as being almost Swiss-like; it does have a hint of that nutty-sweet-tang of the Alpine cheeses. Try it with a beer (I think it might go well with an IPA or American Pale Ale) or with the Rioja left over from the previous entry.

Omelette with Aged Cheddar, Smoked Salmon, and Asparagus

Adapted from the Fromagerie des Basques website

Omelettes do not need much instruction, but sometimes it’s nice to have a suggestion for a filling. In this case, add chives to the eggs before they are cooked, and try layering a few slices of Four-Year-Old Cheddar (the Goat Cheddar would also be particularly lovely here) with smoked salmon and blanched asparagus.